Oia Donkeys

  Oia. Beautiful white buildings, blue seas, fantastic views. And donkeys.
Arrive at Oia by boat and you have two simple choices – ride a donkey to the top of the cliff or take on a vary steep walk up the cliff path.
Here, the donkeys are heading home as the day heads towards sunset. from 500px Oia Donkeys
via IFTTT

Bunny Chow - Home made in the UK.

Bunny Chow – A Durban Speciality

 

One thing that has to be a part of any trip to Durban is a Bunny Chow. But Durban is far away, so I had to make one at home. There is something really delicious and comforting about a serving of good curry in a hollowed out loaf of bread with the gravy soaked into the bread! That’s my latest attempt above. A lamb curry garnished simply with coriander leaves. A bunny chow is, of course, eaten with fingers, using the bread.

 

History of the Bunny Chow

 

The bunny chow appears to have originated in Durban in the 1940’s, though there are different stories about how it came to be. One way or another Durban, and for that matter a good part of kwaZulu-Natal, has a large population of Indian descent. Durban is known for its curries.

 

The bunny chow is basically a curry in bread, with the bread used as a bowl. Originally the curry would have been vegetable, but over the years mutton and chicken have become common. I have also eaten beef curry in a bunny. And, of course, it is unusual to find a mutton curry in the UK, so lamb it is!

 

Typically it comes, in Durban, as a “full” (i.e. 800g loaf), “half” (half an 800g loaf) or a “quarter” (typically half a small, or 400g loaf). The middle of the bread is carefully removed as a single piece, leaving the crust as the bowl. The crust is filled with curry, and the bread removed from the middle used to top the filling. Sambals can be added as necessary.

 

Bunny Chow in the UK and Making Your Own

 

There are a number of places in the UK advertising bunny chow in various forms, though I have only once sampled a local version, from a South African kiosk in Camden Market in London. I have heard that it is popular in some places, with pubs offering it on one day a week, then two, then all week.

 

If you are making your own bunny chow, there are two parts to remember:

 

  1. Bread which can form a bowl;
  2. Curry which has plenty of rich gravy. It can be meat or veg.

 

Personally I prefer to make the curry to fill the bread, but you can buy the curry from your local Indian takeaway. The do look at you sideways if you don’t order rice or naan, though.

 

Simply remove the centre of the bread, fill the crust with your chosen curry, and enjoy!

 

A Google search brought up a few UK based bunny chow restaurants. Not surprising as there are a few South Africans around:

 

 

My Bunny Chow Recipe

 

I have a big family, so this is intended to feed 8 people. Curry freezes well, though we rarely have any leftovers to freeze.

 

Play with quantities and spice mix as you wish, using this as a base.

 

This recipe has been used for mutton and beef, and, with a couple of variations, chicken. In the UK i use it with lamb.

 

Ingredients

 

  • Cooking oil
  • 3 large white onions
  • 12 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped
  • Ginger – I use about half of a ginger root from the supermarket
  • 4 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 6 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 2 sticks cinnamon
  • 3 or 4 chillies – depending on how hot you like it. I use 4 supermarket chillies
  • salt to taste
  • 2kg meat
  • 3 tins tomato
  • Coriander leaves
  • Bread – 4 x 400g loaves, farmhouse, split tin or small sandwich loaves

 

Method

 

Brown the onions. add the garlic and ginger and fry it all together for a minute.

 

Add the coriander, cumin, cinnamon, salt and stir it all up together.

 

Add the meat, mix it all up and mix it all up well. Let it cook for ten minutes.

 

Add the tomatoes and chillies, turn the heat down and let it simmer slowly for about an hour. It’s cooked when the meat is tender and the oil is rising to the surface.

 

Cut the loaves in half and carefully remove the bread from the centre in one piece. Fill the crusts with curry, garnish with coriander leaves, put the removed bread and top and enjoy.

 

 

 

 

Flying Away -gear up - Airbus A380 taking off at Heathrow terminal 5

A380 Gear Up!

Gear Up! I caught this Airbus A380 taking off at London Heathrow airport as we were about to depart on a trip. Timing was just great as the undercarriage has been retracted, but the doors are still open.
 
We caught a BA A380 later that day, which was our first trip in the big double-decker jet. I have to say it was a much more pleasant experience than the return trip in an aging BA 747!
 
Hmm. Perhaps it’s time to go again – photos like this make me restless.
 

Photo Notes

“Gear Up” was taken outside Heathrow Terminal 5 Departures. Shot with the Panasonic Lumix TZ100 f/6.3 1/800s ISO 125.

#aircraft #takeoff✈ #takeoff #aeroplane #aeroplanetakeoff #takeoff #a380 #airbus #airbus380 #airliners #travel #getaway #grabshot #heathrow #heathrowterminal5 #landinggear #undercarriage #gearup Posted on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/Bftw1DAl8RK/@hairy1travels.

Little Crab on the Beach at Vilanculos

Little Crab on the Beach

A little crab coming out of his hole on the beach. As you walk along a secluded beach at low tide little mounds of sand next to a hole seem to be all over the place. Many of these are made by little crabs which have been hiding in their burrows during the higher water. Once the surface sand is dry they pop out and go foarging, always with an eye out for danger. Move too close and they will scurry back into their holes.

Photo Notes

The Little Crab was captured on the beach at Vilanculos, Mozambique.

Travelling light (more or less), as we were leaving for an island trip, I had the Canon EOS 60D with the EF 70-300 zoom. These were shot by simply setting the lens at closest focus and moving until the crab was in focus. Hence the short depth of field. All at f/8 1/500 ISO100. These were edited online in Google Photos.

 

Shadows in the snow on a winter night

Shadows in the Snow

Winter. Snow. Cold. For me that’s a good excuse to stay inside in the warmth! Hibernate perhaps? The light from a window creating these shadows in the snow intrigued me. I just had to go out for a few moments and grab the photo.

Photo Notes

This photo of shadows in the snow was taken with the excellent little Panasonic Lumix TZ100, using the Handheld Nightshot Mode. This mode shoots six frames very rapidly and then combines them. It really is a useful feature at night. The mixed lighting carried an orange hue which was corrected in Snapseed.

 

#tz100 #tz100camera #lumixtz100 #lumixtz100 #nightshot #shadow #shadows #shadowsonsnow #snowday #snow #nightsnow #uksnow #garden #gardening #gardensnow
Industrial Robin on a bin

Industrial Robin Red Breast

Industrial robin outside a factory

It is amazing where you will find the little robin. I saw this little guy at work. Outside in a break area, he was right at home wlaking around people’s feet and picking up scraps. The location is an industrial park in the UK. All concrete and machinery and people, with the odd bush or small tree around. Far removed from a nice urban garden.

I did look but didn’t find a nest.

Not having any alternative, these photos were taken with a mobile phone. Which shows just how tame this little guy is!