Valley of a Thousand Hills seen from Botha's Hill

Valley of a Thousand Hills

Valley of a Thousand Hills

Botha’s Hill

Taking a day away from the beach, we headed up the main road from Durban to Pietermaritzburg then turned right to Botha’s Hill. Eventually we came to the fantastic view of the Valley of a Thousand Hills. What a tremendous view of the hills under a stormy sky.

Comrades Marathon Country

Heading back down the old main road we came across the Comrades Marathon wall of honour commemorating the achievement of those who successfully completed the “Comrades”.

The Comrades Marathon is, of course, the annual run between Pietermaritzburg, provincial capital of kwaZulu-Natal, and Durban. A distance of around 90km Largely following the old main road. The run is “down” one year, from Pietermaritzburg to Durban, and “up” the following year.

Lunchtime, Game Parks and the Meander

Heading back towards Durban we stopped off at the Phezulu Safari Park. It has a small wildlife park, but, having seen African wildlife many times in the bush, we were more interested in lunch. Sadly the restaurant was closed, but the view was good.

I’m told that a few of these parks have started up and this area features on the KZN Midlands Meander. That’s a trip worth doing if you are visiting the area. Having lived in kwaZulu-Natal we have seen most of the meander at various times, and it is a great area to visit.

A bit further down the road we found the Pot and Kettle. This somewhat eccentric appearing, family run restaurant gave us a good lunch.

Tug waiting for a ship near cranes in durban Harbour

Durban Harbour Day Out

A tug waiting for an incoming ship near cranes in Durban Harbour

Durban Harbour – The Port of Durban

Visitors on Durban beachfront as a laden container ship leaves Durban harbour.

Visitors on Durban beachfront as a laden container ship leaves Durban harbour.

If you live in, or stay around Durban you can’t help but be aware of Durban harbour. Spend a bit of time on the Durban beachfront and you can’t miss the large ships at anchor out towards the horizon. Ships of various kinds wait at anchor along the northern kwaZulu-Natal coast for their turn to unload and reload in the harbour. From our spot at Umdloti, one night we counted 33 ships at anchor, after a big storm the day before our arrival caused problems and delays.

Following the outlines of the bay discovered by Vasco de Gama in 1497, Durban harbour, technically The Port of Durban, is the second biggest harbour in Africa and is an important link in trade with South Africa and countries to the north.

Boats, Cranes and Restaurants

Durban harbour is also something of a tourist attraction. A number of restaurants are situated around the harbour. Tourists can take boat tours around the harbour, ranging from short small boat trips, to meals on one of the large floating restaurants. Want to go sea fishing? You can arrange the trip and sail from the harbour.

We took some time out at Zacks on Wilson’s Wharf and just sat and enjoyed a couple of drinks while we watched the activity in the harbour. The weather was good for a jaunt like this. Typical of Durban weather at this time of year, some days are overcast, some are sunny and hot. Even when it’s overcast, it is warm.

It’s amazing the watch the big cranes offloading containers from the ships. At a distance those big containers look like Lego blocks as the cranes effortlessly swing them away.

On a small spit of land nearby people are fishing, as we watch small pleasure craft taking tourists and school kids, on a day out, around the harbour.We noticed, too, big efforts to keep the harbour clean, with a group of workers picking up refuse which washes ashore.

French Navy frigate Floréal in Durban Harbour

French Navy frigate Floréal in Durban Harbour

Over on the other side we can see a navy ship in a berth, dwarfed by the container ship being loaded behind it. We later identified the ship online as the French Navy monitoring frigate, Floréal.

There is continuous activity going on all over.

 

 

Harbour Mouth

Portuguese registered container vessel Jogela in Durban harbour mouth

Portuguese registered container vessel Jogela in Durban harbour mouth

Later in the day we headed for the harbour mouth. If you have never see a big ship coming into harbour, this is fascinating. We could see the ship clearly heading into the port.

We arrived in time to see the pilot boat returning from the ship. Obviously the harbour pilot was on board and the large container ship was on its way into the harbour mouth.

I had seen a tug move to park near some cranes, seemingly waiting for something. The tug moved up just in front of us and simply stopped dead in the water in the channel, something very odd to see, as boats normally don’t just stop in the water.

In due course the massive container ship moved in, engines just ticking over, dwarfing the tug. It looked as if it was going to run over the smaller boat. As the ship came along side the tug, it matched speed and stayed with the big boat to guide it to its berth. Obviously these crews do this every day, and make it look it look very smooth and easy, but it’s fascinating to watch for the first time.

Beach

We spent a bit of time on the beach near the Durban Ski-Boat Club. There wasn’t much activity on this Monday morning, but some good views of the city, and nearby apartments.

 

Visit the Harbour

In all the years I went to Durban on holiday, and then lived there I never went to see the harbour. If you are visiting Durban, make a point of it. It’s worth it.

 

Buy Prints

Check out a selection of my Durban photos and buy some prints on my Pixels Site.
Art Prints - Durban Skyline from Bay of Plenty
Ship entering Durban Harbour - Photography Prints
Bay of Plenty - Durban - Art Prints

 

 
 
 
 
Breaking waves and ships near Durban

Breaking Waves and Ships

Breaking waves and ships on the horizon at Umhlanga

Breaking Waves and Ships

Here’s another take on the Breaking Waves post. This time the breaking waves and ships, which are visible on the horizon.

Umhlanga is close enough to Durban so that there is often shipping on the horizon waiting to enter Durban Harbour Nothing like just sitting on a beach watching the waves break, watching the ships on the horizon. Where have the ships been? Where are they going?
They don’t look big, but the force of waves and the backwash are strong.
Umhlanga, kwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

from 500px Breaking Waves and Ships
via IFTTT

Photography Notes

Cropping a photo is an old photography technique, just made simpler by digital photography. On the other side of the coin, which crop do we want to display. i couldn’t decide, so I posted both.

Cocktails at the Lighthouse Bar at the Oyster Box in Umhlanga Rocks

Cocktail Time at the Lighthouse

A couple of cocktails at the Lighthouse Bar at the Oyster Box Hotel in Umhlanga Rocks. Photos from our Durban trip in 2016 – Umhlanga week.

Cocktail time. After our high tea at the Oyster Box in Umhlanga we paid a visit to the Lighthouse Bar. Great cocktails and good service. Stay and eat eat if you like – the menu looked good. After the high tea we could not have done the menu any justice.

#umhlanga #rocks.

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